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wisp_challenge [2018/07/11 08:26]
127.0.0.1 external edit
wisp_challenge [2018/10/04 21:51] (current)
73.221.1.211
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 //The WISP Challenge is closed at this time, but WISPs are likely still available. Please visit [[http://​wisp5.wikispaces.com/​|wisp5.wikispaces.com]] for up-to-date information.//​\\ ​ //The WISP Challenge is closed at this time, but WISPs are likely still available. Please visit [[http://​wisp5.wikispaces.com/​|wisp5.wikispaces.com]] for up-to-date information.//​\\ ​
 ===== What is WISP? ===== ===== What is WISP? =====
-{{http://​www.seattle.intel-research.net/​wisp/​wispgen3hw.JPG|external ​image wispgen3hw.JPG}}\\ ​ WISP stands for Wireless Identification and Sensing Platform. The term "​Identification"​ comes from "Radio Frequency Identification"​ (RFID). WISPs have the capabilities of RFID tags, but also support sensing and computing. Like any passive RFID tag, WISP is powered and read by a standard off-the-shelf RFID reader, harvesting the power it uses from the reader'​s emitted radio signals. WISPs have been used to sense quantities such as light, temperature,​ acceleration,​ strain, liquid level, and to investigate embeddeded security. Most of the work on WISP so far has involved single WISPs performing sensing or computing functions. We think the next phase of WISP work will involve the interaction of many WISPs, and thus allow an exciting exploration of a new battery-free form of wireless sensor networking.\\ \\  Most people are familiar with RFID tags. Most common are passive RFID tags, where a battery-less IC device harvests power from a nearby RFID reader and uses it to respond to the reader with an identification number. Two broadly adopted standards for this technology are the Electronic Product Code (EPC) Class 1 Generation 1 and Class 1 Generation 2 standards, which operate in the Ultra High Frequency (UHF) bands. The standard is led by [[http://​www.epcglobalinc.org/​home|EPCGlobal]].\\ \\  WISPs are powered by harvested energy from off-the-shelf UHF RFID readers. To a RFID reader, a WISP is just a normal EPC gen1 or gen2 tag; but inside the WISP, the harvested energy is operating a 16-bit general purpose microcontroller. The microcontroller can perform a variety of computing tasks, including sampling sensors, and reporting that sensor data back to the RFID reader. WISPs have been built with light sensors, temperature sensors, and strain gauges. WISPs can write to flash and perform cryptographic computations.\\ \\  WISP is a project of Intel Research Seattle with significant input from students and faculty of the University of Washington. The lead investigator of the WISP project is [[http://​www2.seattle.intel-research.net/​%7Ejrsmith/​|Joshua R. Smith]], Principal Engineer at Intel Research Seattle. The key WISP design and development personnel are Alanson Sample (Intel Research Seattle & UW EE Grad student), Dan Yeager (UW EE Grad student), and Polly Powledge (Intel Research Seattle engineer). The publications list below documents contributions from others at Intel and UW.\\  WISPs have these features:\\ \\ +{{:​wispgen3hw.jpg|image wispgen3hw.JPG}}\\ ​ WISP stands for Wireless Identification and Sensing Platform. The term "​Identification"​ comes from "Radio Frequency Identification"​ (RFID). WISPs have the capabilities of RFID tags, but also support sensing and computing. Like any passive RFID tag, WISP is powered and read by a standard off-the-shelf RFID reader, harvesting the power it uses from the reader'​s emitted radio signals. WISPs have been used to sense quantities such as light, temperature,​ acceleration,​ strain, liquid level, and to investigate embeddeded security. Most of the work on WISP so far has involved single WISPs performing sensing or computing functions. We think the next phase of WISP work will involve the interaction of many WISPs, and thus allow an exciting exploration of a new battery-free form of wireless sensor networking.\\ \\  Most people are familiar with RFID tags. Most common are passive RFID tags, where a battery-less IC device harvests power from a nearby RFID reader and uses it to respond to the reader with an identification number. Two broadly adopted standards for this technology are the Electronic Product Code (EPC) Class 1 Generation 1 and Class 1 Generation 2 standards, which operate in the Ultra High Frequency (UHF) bands. The standard is led by [[http://​www.epcglobalinc.org/​home|EPCGlobal]].\\ \\  WISPs are powered by harvested energy from off-the-shelf UHF RFID readers. To a RFID reader, a WISP is just a normal EPC gen1 or gen2 tag; but inside the WISP, the harvested energy is operating a 16-bit general purpose microcontroller. The microcontroller can perform a variety of computing tasks, including sampling sensors, and reporting that sensor data back to the RFID reader. WISPs have been built with light sensors, temperature sensors, and strain gauges. WISPs can write to flash and perform cryptographic computations.\\ \\  WISP is a project of Intel Research Seattle with significant input from students and faculty of the University of Washington. The lead investigator of the WISP project is [[http://​www2.seattle.intel-research.net/​%7Ejrsmith/​|Joshua R. Smith]], Principal Engineer at Intel Research Seattle. The key WISP design and development personnel are Alanson Sample (Intel Research Seattle & UW EE Grad student), Dan Yeager (UW EE Grad student), and Polly Powledge (Intel Research Seattle engineer). The publications list below documents contributions from others at Intel and UW.\\  WISPs have these features:\\ \\ 
  
    
wisp_challenge.txt ยท Last modified: 2018/10/04 21:51 by 73.221.1.211